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Hvac Air Conditioning Heating Federal Tax Credit Changes for 2011 Savings up to 10% $500.00 the new Maximum

ACCA (Air Conditioning Contractors of America) have a new website feature helps contractors and Consumers Find Energy Efficiency Incentives – this wonderful page is worth a look here is the link:  http://www.acca.org/consumer/dsire

FP&L (Florida Power & Light) Residential A/C Rebate Schedule link: 

New Rebate Schedule (Effective March 2012), Rebate Schedule (Old Effective 2008).

Updated 04/26/12: The House Ways and Means Committee is scheduled to hear testimony today on various bills to extend the tax incentives that expired at the end of 2011 or will expire at the end of this year.

According to the Joint Tax Committee, there are approximately 70 tax incentives eligible for extension by Congress, many of them are targeted to help small business owners make capital investments in their businesses.

Members of the Congress will have the opportunity to testify in support of legislation to extend expiring tax provisions they have introduced or co-sponsored legislation this year. There is expected to be discussion of extending the tax credit for the installing higher efficiency HVAC equipment (Section 25C), construction of energy efficient homes (Section 45L), the 15 year straight line depreciation for qualified improvements to leasehold, restaurants, and retail buildings (Section 168), bonus depreciation for small businesses (Section 168), and increased expensing allowance to $500,000/$2,000,000 and expansion of Section 179.

As a member of the Residential Energy Efficient Tax Credit Industry Coalition, ACCA submitted testimony urging for the extension and expansion of the residential energy tax credit. The coalition is seeking a robust energy efficiency tax credit for qualified products, including furnaces, central air conditioners, and heat pumps, of 10 percent of the purchase price up to $1,000. The coalition believes that a $1,000 tax credit is generally the minimum incentive needed to motivate consumers to improve their homes by purchasing these higher-performing products, and to do so in sizable enough numbers to positively influence residential energy consumption.

To read the Member Proposals Related To Certain Tax Provisions That Either Expired In 2011 Or Will Expire In 2012, Click here. End of Update 04/26/12.

 Updated 2/29/12:   There is a bill circulating the Senate that, if passed, will create tax credits for consumers that reduce their energy usage by at least 20%. The bill establishes a $2,000 base credit for the first 20% decrease with a $500 stepend for each 5% reduction thereafter. The credit will be capped at $5,000 or 30% of the qualified expenditures, whichever is the lesser amount.

Experts have estimated that this bill will create about 19,000 jobs through contracting, supply, and manufacturing while saving 1.7 billion kilowatthours and 18 trillion Btu of fuel by 2016. This is enough energy to power 375,000 homes!

No one is sure if Congress will pass the bill as it does not identify where the funding will come from, but the fact that energy saving bills are still being considered in Congress is a good sign. This shows that the national mindset toward energy efficiency is changing, becoming more important to the everyday consumer. End of 2/29/12 update.

After hours of fitful debate, the House of Representatives passed the tax extender package last night by a vote of 277-148. President Obama is scheduled to sign it into law this afternoon. The new law will extend a number expired and expiring tax cuts and other incentives for individuals, families, small businesses, and investors.

 

If you listen to the news sound bites, everyone involved will says the bill is not perfect. Nearly every provision in the bill represents some form of compromise between Democrats and Republicans.

 

Included in the new law are the Section 25c tax credits, the official name for the energy tax credits available to eligible taxpayers who make qualified energy efficient retrofits to their homes. The tax credits are extended through 2011, but at a significantly reduced value and with changes made to some of the qualifying equipment standards.

 

Starting on January 1, 2011 and through December 31, 2011, an eligible homeowner can claim 10% of the costs, capped at $500, for the installation of qualified energy efficient improvements, subject to certain limits.

 

Under the new law, for HVAC and hot water equipment, the maximum a homeowner could claim is $300 for a qualified central air conditioner and heat pump, and $150 for a qualified furnace or hot water boiler, and $50 for any advanced main air circulating fan. The tax credit for qualified hot water heaters is limited to $300.

 

Beyond the change to the tax credit values, the new law will increase the qualifying standards for natural gas hot water boilers, propane hot water boilers, oil furnaces, and oil hot water boilers to 95% AFUE. The qualifying standards for natural gas furnaces and propane furnace remain at 95% AFUE.

 

The qualifying standard for central air conditioners and heat pumps, which were modified by the Stimulus bill in 2009, are not changed. Therefore, a central air conditioner must meet or exceed 16 SEER and 13 EER; and an air source heat pump must meet or exceed 15 SEER and 12.5 EER and 8.5 HSPF, in order to qualify for the tax credit.

 

Finally, the new law reinstates the lifetime credit caps, which disqualify any homeowner who has claimed more than $500 in 25c tax credits since January 1, 2005, from any further credits.

 

While the extension of the tax credits at a lower value is not ideal, it keeps the tax credits alive and leaves open the opportunity to change them in the next Congress and restore them to the $1,500 level. If the tax credits had not been included in the extender package, they would likely have disappeared forever.


This post was written by Luis | December 20, 2010


Aloha Air Conditioning and FPL Make Replacing Your Heating and Cooling System Easy and Affordable

 If your A/C system is over 10 years old, needs frequent repairs or just doesn’t cool or heat like it used to, it may be time to replace it with a new high-efficiency model.

1. FPL can help you by providing:

2.  How to qualify:

3.  How you’ll benefit:

4.  How to start:


This post was written by Luis | December 18, 2010


Maintain Proper Air Care throughout your central air conditioning and heating system

Maintain Proper Air Care

Your indoor air quality can be greatly affected by ventilation, dust, fumes from household products and smoke. To ensure the air inside your home is clean and safe, follow these simple tips:

1. Check your ductwork

2.  Repair leaky ducts

3.  Protect your air quality

4.  Watch your fireplace


This post was written by Luis | December 16, 2010


BREAKING: Proposed Tax Credit Extension

ACCA (Air Conditioning Contractors of America) have a new website feature helps contractors and Consumers Find Energy Efficiency Incentives – this wonderful page is worth a look here is the link:  http://www.acca.org/consumer/dsire

FP&L (Florida Power & Light) Residential A/C Rebate Schedule link: Rebate Schedule.

Updated 04/26/12: The House Ways and Means Committee is scheduled to hear testimony today on various bills to extend the tax incentives that expired at the end of 2011 or will expire at the end of this year.

According to the Joint Tax Committee, there are approximately 70 tax incentives eligible for extension by Congress, many of them are targeted to help small business owners make capital investments in their businesses.

Members of the Congress will have the opportunity to testify in support of legislation to extend expiring tax provisions they have introduced or co-sponsored legislation this year. There is expected to be discussion of extending the tax credit for the installing higher efficiency HVAC equipment (Section 25C), construction of energy efficient homes (Section 45L), the 15 year straight line depreciation for qualified improvements to leasehold, restaurants, and retail buildings (Section 168), bonus depreciation for small businesses (Section 168), and increased expensing allowance to $500,000/$2,000,000 and expansion of Section 179.

As a member of the Residential Energy Efficient Tax Credit Industry Coalition, ACCA submitted testimony urging for the extension and expansion of the residential energy tax credit. The coalition is seeking a robust energy efficiency tax credit for qualified products, including furnaces, central air conditioners, and heat pumps, of 10 percent of the purchase price up to $1,000. The coalition believes that a $1,000 tax credit is generally the minimum incentive needed to motivate consumers to improve their homes by purchasing these higher-performing products, and to do so in sizable enough numbers to positively influence residential energy consumption.

To read the Member Proposals Related To Certain Tax Provisions That Either Expired In 2011 Or Will Expire In 2012, Click here. End of Update 04/26/12.

The Senate version of the tax extender package negotiated by the President Obama and Congressional leaders was released last night. As expected it includes a two year extension of the Bush tax cuts for all income levels, lower capital gains tax rate for investors, increases the exemption for the estate tax to $5 million per individual and lowers the tax rate to 35%, and enacts the Alternative Minimum Tax “patch” for 2010 and 2011, and other pro-small businesses provision.

Unfortunately, while the tax package does include an extension of the 25c nonbusiness energy tax credits, (the official IRS name for the homeowner’s energy efficiency tax credit), last minute modifications were made resetting the credit value to pre-Stimulus bill levels of 10% of the installed costs with maximum credit for all qualified retrofits of $500.

The tax package also reinstates the caps on equipment that were in place in 2006 and 2007. That means the maximum tax credits available to an eligible taxpayer for installing a qualified central air condition and heat pump are $300, and the maximum tax credit available for a qualified furnace or boiler is $150.

The tax extender package also reinstates the  lifetime credit caps which disqualify any homeowner who has claimed more than $500 in 25c tax credits since January 1, 2005, from any further credits.

Finally, the qualifying guidelines for natural gas and propane hot water boilers, and oil furnaces and hot water boilers are increased to 95% AFUE.

I’m still wading through all the language to see what other changes may be buried in the legislative text.

Still no word on whether or not substantive changes will allowed during Senate or House debate, more details about that will be forthcoming, including how you can support any efforts through grassroots action.


This post was written by Luis | December 10, 2010


Nest Self Programming Wifi Thermostat

If you’re comfortable installing a light fixture, you can install Nest. If not, you can buy direct with installation from us. After install, we will complete an energy saving preformance  tune-up on your system. Call now for more information and complete details.Once your new Nest the Learning Thermostat is installed by our certified professional, the next thing to do is teach NEST to save! Nest will do what you tell it, so teach it energy saving habits: turn the temperature down at night or when you leave the house, and don’t turn the temperature too high or low.

Nest will remember to save , even if you forget.

After the first week of training is complete. Your new thermostat will watch your energy use and Energy saving features like Auto-Away™ and Energy Historywill become available as Nest learns. Auto-Away turns heating and cooling down automatically when no one is home, saving energy when you don’t need it. Energy History shows you how much energy you’ve used daily.

Hello, Leaf.

The Nest Leaf appears when you’re saving energy. Changing the temperature just one degree can cut your energy use up to 5%. The Leaf guides you in the right direction every time you turn the Dial. Nest learns to know you! By the eight day, Nest has made a schedule for your home. One-off temperature changes won’t confuse it, but change the temperature a couple of days in a row and Nest will catch on and adjust its schedule. Lower the temperature two Mondays in a row and Nest will remember for next week. Access Nest Online. After an unseasonably warm day, you log in to nest.com from the office to adjust the temperature at home. If you have multiple thermostats, you can view and manage each individually from one Nest Account. When your Nest is connected to Wi-Fi, you can change the temperature, adjust your schedule and check local weather from anywhere. Nest is with you no the go. Use the Nest Mobile app to connect to your thermostat from a smart phone. Getting in early? Change the temperature miles from home. You will love watching the savings add up. If you teach Nest well, you’ll see the savings on your energy bill. And since Nest is always learning and improving, you can expect the savings to continue.

Order the Nest Learning Thermostat and start saving today!


This post was written by Luis | December 10, 2010


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